Couch to 5K – quick update

I know that you are just desperate to know how I’m getting on with Couch to 5K as I haven’t updated for a while… nooo, indeed not! How very dare you think that I would have given up!  Perish the thought!

I will have you know that I completed R3W5 (Run 3 Week 5) yesterday! Woohoo!  And that was no mean feat.  It was a big jump from the eight minute runs right up to twenty – yes, twenty whole minutes!  It was indeed arduous, I thought it would never end and yes I was slow.  I was silently screaming inside my head for it to stop although it didn’t.  But the most important thing is, it wasn’t a glorious summer morning, it was raining, cold and breezy and I still did it.  Does this mean I am a convert? Does this mean I am a real runner?  Am I becoming addicted?  Is a real change taking place? I really hope so.  It would be great to be fit.  I wonder what that feels like?

If I carry on then I am going to need some new running shoes for running in the mud, I am thinking of https://www.inov-8.com/trail-running/best-shoes-for/soft-and-muddy?genders=193 – any thoughts anyone? They’re a bit expensive.

 

Hello, this is me…

Hello this is me,

Sharon Richardson
This is me…

My name is Sharon, welcome to my blog. Please make yourself at home and have a browse through my meanderings. Here is a little insight into me!  My views are wry and often dry but always my own. Thank you for dropping in!

Retirement? You must be joking!

I am ‘retired’ and now live an active rural life (with the odd quick fixes of city-life).  I live in a cottage in a village, that is Nottinghamshire’s best kept secret. Together with my husband I am involved in all kinds of things that keep us out of mischief.

I have a lot of interests and ‘Savour the Moment’ is my personal blog.  This is where I share my thoughts on a variety of topics with anyone who might be remotely interested.   I’ve been involved with marketing communications for most of my adult-life – and by default, the written word.  ‘Savour the Moment’ fulfils my need to write.

I can also post product reviews and will share my feedback.

It’s all about this and that really

I really don’t know what I’ll be sharing from post-to-post.  So, if you’re looking for a consistent topic blog you are out of luck.  The only consistency you will find is that I’m consistently inconsistent.  It depends on my current obsession, at present it’s ‘Couch to 5K’ or me trying to run (for run read ‘gentle jog’)!

I enjoy hearing from readers of my blog and will happily respond to comments.

My favourite things

The kind of things that I like are: Christmas, winter, home, log-fires, the hubster, the kids, the grandkids (with a passion), writing, reading, listening (to Radio 4, to audio books, to people), Paul Simon, James Taylor, Harry Nilsson, Christopher Cross, Andy Williams, Neil Sedaka,  Barbra Streisand, The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Gerry Rafferty,  oh and Harry Potter, Dustin Hoffmann, Alan Rickman, (sigh)… walking, cooking, my friends, making things – anything, red wine, gin and tonic… are you getting the picture?

An old ‘new look’ for Worksop Station

I am the secretary of a local group which has a very catchy title ‘The North Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire Community Rail Partnership, Bassetlaw Area Group’ commonly known as NNLCRPBAG (!) NNLCRP works towards integrating public and private service provision to offer travellers an effective and efficient range of transport choices.  It works in partnership with transport operators, public and private organisations to serve the needs of the communities within which it operates. (Phew! Glad that’s cleared up).

Newly refurbished Worksop Railway Station
All those involved with the refurbishment of Worksop Station

I am the one in the hat!

The group supports, and also acts as a lobby group, to transport providers in this very rural area where I live.  One such project is the refurbishment of Worksop Station, recently completed.  Worksop Station is currently the last stop on the Robin Hood Line, direct out of Nottingham to the Dukeries.  

All those involved in this renovation project got together on Tuesday 17th July to look at – and to celebrate, the completion of the renovation work.  Network Rail  https://www.networkrail.co.uk/ supported by the Railways Heritage Trust  http://railwayheritagetrust.co.uk/ and contractors CML https://www.cml.uk.com/news/ has now completed an authentic restoration of the historic, grade 2-listed, Worksop railway station. The station canopies, roofs and windows have been carefully refurbished and repainted, as has the signal box on the Carlton road crossing.

Signal Box
The signal box at Carlton Road Worksop

The Worksop Station project captured the imagination of everyone involved. Network Rail allocated significant additional funding to complete the heritage detailing. 

Cllr David Pidwell, Cabinet Member for Transport at Bassetlaw District Council http://www.bassetlaw.gov.uk/, said ‘It’s fantastic that so many organisations have worked together to complete this important restoration. Worksop station is a gateway to the town from both the rail and road network; it is a potent symbol for the people of Worksop. The station is one of the few buildings in the town which provides a practical service every day to its people whilst having its roots embedded in the heritage of the area.’

Platform 1 Canopy at Worksop Station
The Great Central Rail (GCR) livery restored to Worksop Station

The new colour scheme is that originally used by The Great Central Railway (GCR) in England which came into being when the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway changed its name in 1897 in anticipation of the opening in 1899 of its London Extension. The GCR was the first railway to be granted a coat of arms. The arms were granted on 25 February 1898. On 1 January 1923, the company was grouped into the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER).

Worksop Station will feature in this year’s Worksop Charter celebrations, on Saturday 8th September.

Still Running!

No, I can’t quite believe it either and now, on the eve of W4R2 (Week 4 run 2 Couch to 5K) https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/couch-to-5k-week-by-week/ I am running for five minutes at a time. Who would have thought it?

Yes, I have completed run 1 for Week 4 but it was hard.  There is an online community of Cto5kers AND there is a sub group for the over 60 Cto5kers. https://healthunlocked.com/couchto5k/posts/ I have learnt from them that it can be done and that they too were full of self-doubt and even ‘scared’ at the sprospect of running for five full minutes.  It doesn’t sound very long but my legs and lungs think otherwise but it really is mind over matter.  I have found someone in this group, who is a lot like me but just one week ahead of me on the Cto5K.  I am in awe of ‘RunForest’ as he/she is known.

I have mapped out all the runs in my diary, juggling run days with grandparenting duties and other commitments.  There can be no excuse, I will do this. I make sure there is a day between each run day, as very strongly recommended by the running community.

My running is, I think, very slow and I will probably need to pick up the pace a bit in order to complete 5K.   But that is not my only goal.  I want to be fit (and it would be nice if a byproduct of that was the loss of some weight) and be healthy and I want to be able to run 5K with my daughter (who has run half-marathons) and my eight year old granddaughter.  Wouldn’t that be something?

I am sure my legs can do it, I am sure my lungs can cope – it’s my brain that finds it difficult, my mindset.  I am, as my mother would have said ‘my own worst enemy’.  I could easily sabotage myself, I know that.  I am wondering if there are some tips of a psychological nature that might provide the key to this, if there are then please let me know what they are.

It isn’t an effort to get up and put my trainers on and go out and do this – well, I have done it twelve times already and clearly there is an improvement: Week 1 was one-minute runs and now it’s five-minute runs, so there must be.  I suppose I am looking for some physical evidence that will convince me that this is all worthwhile.

Me and the Chesterfield Canal towpath

I do get to see the early mornings that this wonderful summer is providing for us and the countryside where I live.

Keep on running then yeah?

A Walk with Alpacas

A very unique gift

I received a very unique gift-experience for my birthday, from a very thoughtful friend.   A walk with alpacas.  I took this opportunity to take two of my grandchildren to share the experience, to Treswell, Nottinghamshire, England.

Getting to know the alpacas
Getting to know the alpacas

A passion for alpacas

A husband and wife team, with a passion for alpacas, look after a small-holding ‘OrionTree’ https://oriontree.uk/  They are specialist breeders and keep their herd small.  Anyone who wishes to try one of their experiences is guanteed a hands-on encounter with a difference.

Me and my alpaca
A walk with alpacas

Chalk and cheese

Eight year old Evie and five year old Jack couldn’t wait to meet the alpacas.  Jack loves all kinds of animals and was eager to get stuck in.  Evie, on the other hand, is a little more reserved and preferred to ‘just help Grandma’.

An image of one of the alpacas ready for his walk
One of the alpacas ready for his walk

A calm and gentle nature

Alpacas are beautiful, friendly creatures with a very calm and gentle nature.  They make exceptionally easy walking companions and the team at Oriontree can adapt the walk to suit but they generally stick to a routine. 

Jack with James the alpaca
Confidently walking with my alpaca

Hello boys

After a short introduction the machos (alpaca boys) are brought out.  We were each paired with our alpaca and off we went.  Both children were entranced with their partners from the beginning and it wasn’t long before Grandma’s help was no longer needed. 

A confident little girl leading her alpaca
I can do this

Snack break

A short break at the half-way point provided the opportunity for Jack to ask all his questions.  He needed to know about the alpacas’ teeth and the difference between alpacas and llamas and countless other things.   All questions were patiently and knowledgeably answered by our hostess.  Meanwhile ‘the boys’  chomped their way through a box full of snacks, fed to them by the Evie and Jack.

Alpacas are beautiful, gentle creatures
Alpacas are beautiful, gentle creatures

An absolute delight

It was a very unique experience.  We all learnt a lot and it was a pleasure to be in the company of such beautiful creatures, especially in the lovely, North Nottinghamshire countryside.  https://www.innorthnotts.co.uk/

 

A walk with alpacas in the wonderful Nottinghamshire countryside?

I would highly recommend.

Week 2 is in the bag! #W2Cto5K

I have to say that I never expected to be looking forward to W3Cto5K (week 3 Couch to 5K) but I am! https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/couch-to-5k-week-by-week/

I know it is still early days and there is still a long way to go. Last week I was listening to the coach on my Cto5K app and silently screaming at her to make it stop, however this morning I realised that I wasn’t. I don’t think I can quite call myself a runner as yet.

The early morning start helps, although 8.30am is not that early to some but it isn’t too hot and there aren’t that many people about and it’s early enough for me.  It leaves me feeling energised (and righteous) for the rest of the day and positive and wanting to run again… but that’s not allowed.

Chesterfield Canal

I am very fortunate to have the Chesterfield Canal http://www.chesterfield-canal-trust.org.uk/ right on my doorstep, it is a very picturesque waterway.  In fact, this morning the dredger was gently chugging along scooping up the algae a very tranquil scene.  Views across the North Nottinghamshire countryside are very uplifting and at this time of the year (without wishing to sound poetic) it is ‘golden’. This is definitely not your pavement pounding route and I expect, come the autumn, I might have a different, muddier tale to tell.

Chesterfield Canal, Wiseton

It is possible that I can step up the pace a little without breaking the rule of: ‘do not run every day’. At present I am working on 3 runs per week but if I run every other day that will make it 3/4 per week won’t it?  Which might help me to maintain the momentum. Worth a punt I reckon.

As you can probably tell, I am feeling very positive – probably because I haven’t come a cropper as yet and probably because I am doing exactly as Sarah Millican (Cto5K coach) says. If she says ‘Off you go!’ Then that’s what I do. I am impressed with the programme devised by the NHS… so far. Long may it continue.

I will see you back here this time next week to let you know how it feels to be looking at Week 4!

Today, I ran! #thisgirlcan #thisoldgirlcan

I really can’t say how this happened.  Could it have been the football (yawn)?  The tennis?  Or just a general feeling of  ‘I have to do something about this weighty issue that is surrounding me.’  Whatever it is, something has made me think that if I could run fifteen years ago and really not that much has changed, then surely I can run now… can’t I?  Obviously, I need to look into this properly.

Trainers on

I had heard about the NHS ‘Couch to 5K’ scheme.  Hmmm 5K roughly 3 miles, right?  Surely I can do that.  I am carrying extra weight, I am 64 (and a bit) and I haven’t done any form of exercise for a very long time so let’s get this into perspective.  My research found a website https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/couch-to-5k-week-by-week/ and an app ‘Couch to 5K’ – I read the reviews, all very positive.  Surely 25k downloads can’t be wrong.

Well, no time like the present.  I need to check that the old kit fits, (if I can find it and I can always borrow one of the hubster’s big tees if not) and get everything ready the night before I can do an early morning run – before it gets too hot.  There’s no way I can stay the course if I try to run in this 30oC but a pleasant 16/17oC should be OK. That’s it then, app downloaded, old work-out gear prepared, socks and trainers all in place, hat for shade and disguise, ear pods at the ready.  There really is no excuse.  I live right by a canal tow path, a bit tussocky but only dog-walkers will see me, the views are tranquil and calming and it’s only butterflies that get in the way.

Across the fields

Sarah Millican http://sarahmillican.co.uk/ (my coach of preference) instructed me to prepare by doing a 5 minute brisk walk.  I can do that.  Well at least, that’s what these trainers know how to do. Followed by a one minute gentle-jog-run-keep-it-slow.  One minute right?  That’s only 60 seconds, I can do anything for 60 seconds.  The brisk walk went well.  Ready, steady, go!  One minute’s gentle run.  I’d did it and I did 7 more too, interspersed with 90 second recovery walks, ending with a 5 minute cool down walk.  I did it!  I can’t quite believe it but I did it.  One run in the bag and it’s recommended that I do 3 of these per week.  

View from the bridge

But… I am already thinking ahead and looking at the possible obstacles.  If I do keep this up, and there is no reason why I shouldn’t, what happens when it is not a golden morning and the tussocks have turned to mud?  Are there special trainers for that? What will I notice first from this exercise? What are the benefits? I want to become addicted to it, just like I was addicted to aerobics twenty years ago.  And as the old adage says ‘if you don’t use it, you lose it!’  What words of encouragement and what advice have you got for me?

By the tow path

Oh, I forgot to mention, I am keeping this quiet as I don’t want to set my self up to fail 😉

 

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